It appears that you don't have JavaScript enabled. Abandoned UE requires the use of JavaScript for the full user experience.
Several parts of the site will fail to work properly with it disabled. We highly recommend that you enable it.
USER »
PASS »
AUTO »
LOGIN
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Canada Malting Company Plant
Montreal Complex

Nested on the edge of the Lachine Canal sits the Toronto Malt Plant's big brother, and like many big brothers, he ain't messing around. The Montreal complex is significantly larger in size than the Toronto complex (even considering that half the Toronto complex was demolished), and just as delightfully decayed and sketchy. So this made it the perfect venue for an exploring party, as nothing goes better with alcohol than gaping holes in the floor and long falls to one's demise!

Location attributes for Canada Malting Company Plant
Location   Montreal, Quebec
Built :: Closed   1904 :: 1989
Status   Abandoned
Difficulty   ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
Hazards Risk   ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
Security Risk   ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
AUE Rating   ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

The Montreal complex predates the Toronto complex by 24 years, with the construction of the original terra-cotta silos (the concrete silos were part of the 1940's expansion to the complex), and in it's heyday produced upwards of 250,000 pounds of malt per year. However, the closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 left the plant accessible only by rail transportation, and the end of the complex began in the 1980's when Canada Malting moved to a new facility on the St. Lawrence seaway. The plant was utilized by new owners until 1989, when CN Rail decommissioned the rail corridor servicing it, sealing the fate of the complex. It has sat disused since then.

The current owners of the facility, while having no plans for the grounds, are not even remotely fond of those exploring the ruins, and have gone to great measures to secure the facility. All windows and doors within 20' of ground have been sealed, making the complex a bit of a fortress to get into.

A few months prior to my visit, a post went up on the UER forums about an explorer party at the old Malt Plant, and to message the organizer for details. Naturally, I couldn't pass such an opportunity up... while I had been to Montreal previously, it was always with family and I couldn't get away for some exploring, so this was the perfect opportunity to sample their derelict industrial.

Under the cover of darkness, and in our finest dress, we made our way into the plant, which had been set up for the party in dramatic fashion. Tea candle walkways, literal red carpets... the attention to detail was spectacular. And just like that, the party was underway! Many of the locals opted to stay in the central area, while those of us who had never sampled the complex slipped into the shadows and began lining up our shots.

My only regret is that I didn't muster up the nerve to climb the ladder of death... literally, three different ladders that had been welded together that you had to climb up to get on top of the terra-cotta silos. The ladders were above a 30+ foot drop that filled with sharp, rusty bits of metal... because surely the drop itself wasn't fatal enough already. Seeing some of the photos from that area all but guarantee that a return visit is in order, and there will be no making of this mistake a second time.

 
 
Bringing the Bass - September 2016 (Non-Public Content)
   
 
 
High Point - September 2017 (Non-Public Content)
   
 
 
Fermentation - September 2018 (Non-Public Content)
   
 
 
 
 
© 2006-2019 Abandoned UE v3.0 - Contents may not be reproduced in any form without prior written permission
Design influenced by Ward 7 Studios - Icons by Mark James
 
This Website Collects Private Information & Uses Cookies
Your privacy is of utmost respect to us here at Abandoned UE. We only collect personal information and use cookies to personalize content; we do not share it with any other websites or users. These settings can be updated at any time from the Privacy Page, which also contains a full disclosure of what data is collected.
I consent to the following data collection purposes and cookie usage purposes:
Cookies
Necessary
Advertising
Preferences
Statistics
 
System Data
Necessary
Advertising
Preferences
Statistics
 
OK